“Boscutti’s Steve Jobs” Scene 140

An ongoing daily series of scenes for a Steve Jobs biopic.

It’s a narrative experiment. It’s not going to follow a neat dramatic arc. It’s going to be a little episodic and random. Much like the subject matter.

This is the final scene.

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“BOSCUTTI’S STEVE JOBS” SCENE 140

 

2011 – JOBS FAMILY HOME – PALO ALTO – MORNING

It’s October 5. It’s a Wednesday, It’s 3pm. Jobs is lying back in bed surrounded by his family. Looking out at his wife, Laurene. His children Lisa, Reed, Erin, Eve. His biological sister, MONA, 54. His adoptive sister, PATTY, 54. Eve is wiping back tears.

Sunlight flows into the room. Jobs has been battling a rare form of pancreatic cancer since 2004. It has left his body withered, emaciated.

Job’s breathing become shorter as if climbing a steep path. His lungs weaken. He pushes further.

A silver amulet gleams on the bedside table. Sorrow leaves him as he realizes that to love others is all. That love is what sets you free. Continue reading

“Boscutti’s Steve Jobs” Scene 139

An ongoing daily series of scenes for a Steve Jobs biopic.

It’s a narrative experiment. It’s not going to follow a neat dramatic arc. It’s going to be a little episodic and random. Much like the subject matter.

To get the next scene in your inbox as soon as its written, click the + Follow button below or simply subscribe for free. If you change your mind later, unsubscribe with one click.

Share this scene with your friends.

 
 


 

“BOSCUTTI’S STEVE JOBS” SCENE 139

 

2011 – JOBS FAMILY HOME – PALO ALTO – MORNING

It’s September. Jobs is sitting in bed, wearing a hospital gown and holding his copy of Paramhansa Yogananda’s “Autobiography of a Yogi.” More medical equipment surrounds the bed.

Every breath he takes is excruciatingly painful. Two of Jobs full-time nurses, Tracy and Arturo, are by his side. One of them monitors the equipment. A glass of water on the bedside table is half full.

Jobs’ wife, Laurene, is there with their son, REED, 20, who is trying not to cry. Laurene breathes out slowly.

The more Jobs realizes his unity with spirit, the less he can be dominated by matter.

The soul is ever-free. It is deathless because birthless.

It cannot be regimented by stars.

“Boscutti’s Steve Jobs” Scene 138

An ongoing daily series of scenes for a Steve Jobs biopic.

It’s a narrative experiment. It’s not going to follow a neat dramatic arc. It’s going to be a little episodic and random. Much like the subject matter.

To get the next scene in your inbox as soon as its written, click the + Follow button below or simply subscribe for free. If you change your mind later, unsubscribe with one click.

Share this scene with your friends.

 
 


 

“BOSCUTTI’S STEVE JOBS” SCENE 138

 

2011 – JOBS FAMILY HOME – PALO ALTO – NIGHT

It’s August. Jobs is sitting on the edge of the bed, wearing a robe. His head is slumped forward, his breathing shallow.

His wife, Laurene, gently rubs his back. Medical equipment surounds a bedside table. Art books are piled on the floor. Another of Jobs’ full-time nurses, ELHAM, stands nearby.

Jobs’ youngest daughter, Eve, 12, stands in the door way, not wanting to come in. Her older sister, Erin, 16 walks past.

Jobs has always had a complicated relationship with his children. For ten years he refused paternity of his first daughter born out of wedlock in 1978. Despite naming Apple’s Lisa computer after her. He put Apple before everything. Even before his three children with Laurene. Even before Laurene.

As an adopted child Jobs had his own demons to deal with. He always regarded his adoptive parents, the late Paul and Clara Jobs, as his real parents, pure and simple. But being adopted is the greatest loss of control you can ever experience. You can spend your whole life craving control as much as love.

Jobs wanted his biography written by Walter Isaacson so that his children would know him and understand his choices.

Perhaps even understand him.

“Boscutti’s Steve Jobs” Scene 137

An ongoing daily series of scenes for a Steve Jobs biopic.

It’s a narrative experiment. It’s not going to follow a neat dramatic arc. It’s going to be a little episodic and random. Much like the subject matter.

To get the next scene in your inbox as soon as its written, click the + Follow button below or simply subscribe for free. If you change your mind later, unsubscribe with one click.

Share this scene with your friends.

 
 


 

“BOSCUTTI’S STEVE JOBS” SCENE 137

 

2011 – JOBS FAMILY HOME – PALO ALTO – TWILIGHT

It’s July. Jobs is standing in his bedroom, lost in his thoughts.

His cancer is incredibly clever. He’s beaten it back repeatedly. And every time it comes back with new ways to attack him. He has no more ways to fight it.

Another of Jobs’ full-time nurses, ARTURO, stands nearby.

Jobs laughs to himself. He fought the cancer with everything he had. He even enjoyed the fight.

What makes the man is not the triumphs, but the tragedies. Wait long enough and every triumph brings with it its own defeat. How we deal with defeat and failure defines us, makes us.

Jobs’ traumatic early childhood experiences, his unwed parents giving him up for adoption, dropping out of college, garage start-up, counterculture experiments. Even his dismissal from his own company.

Jobs figured out what he is good at. And he nourishes his gift. Once he decides what he is trying to do, he is undeterred. He does it with courage and deliberation, absolute focus. He seeks the truth.

When he gave his Stanford commencement speech he told the graduates the truth. Told them their time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Told them to stay hungry. To stay foolish.

Jobs wonders where all these memories will go once he dies.

Maybe that’s all he’ll truly leave behind.

“Boscutti’s Steve Jobs” Scene 136

An ongoing daily series of scenes for a Steve Jobs biopic.

It’s a narrative experiment. It’s not going to follow a neat dramatic arc. It’s going to be a little episodic and random. Much like the subject matter.

To get the next scene in your inbox as soon as its written, click the + Follow button below or simply subscribe for free. If you change your mind later, unsubscribe with one click.

Share this scene with your friends.

 
 


 

“BOSCUTTI’S STEVE JOBS” SCENE 136

 

2011 – JOBS FAMILY HOME – PALO ALTO – AFTERNOON

It’s July. Jobs is standing in his office with LARRY PAGE, 37. Page is the cofounder of Google, a company Apple is at war with. Page is about to resume control of Google. Jobs is staring at him. Gaunt, thin, fingertips resting on the desk for balance.

JOBS
You got to focus.

Page looks anxious. Any bad blood between the two is put to one side as Jobs freely offers advice.

JOBS
Larry, you got to figure out what Google wants to be when it grows up.

One of Jobs’ full-time nurses, TRACY, is standing nearby.

JOBS
Google is now all over the map. What are the five products you want to focus on? Get rid of the rest, because they’re dragging you down. They’re causing you to turn out products that are adequate but not great.

Tracy checks her watch. Jobs coughs, smiles.

JOBS
They’re turning you into Microsoft.

Page smiles too. Jobs closes his eyes. Everything around him begins to dissolve.

“Boscutti’s Steve Jobs” Scene 135

An ongoing daily series of scenes for a Steve Jobs biopic.

It’s a narrative experiment. It’s not going to follow a neat dramatic arc. It’s going to be a little episodic and random. Much like the subject matter.

To get the next scene in your inbox as soon as its written, click the + Follow button below or simply subscribe for free. If you change your mind later, unsubscribe with one click.

Share this scene with your friends.

 
 


 

“BOSCUTTI’S STEVE JOBS” SCENE 135

 

2011 – APPLE WORLD WIDE DEVELOPERS CONFERENCE – SAN FRANCISCO – MORNING

It’s June. ATTENDEES are settling into their seats. Sounds of Ray Charles’ “What I’d Say” kicking around the vast auditorium.

Apple head of design Jony Ive is walking along the front of the stage to his front row seat. A voice over the sound system asks everyone to switch their electronic devices to silent mode. Sounds of James Brown’s “I Feel Good” fades up then down.

Lights fade down on the stage. Random applause scatters through the audience.

Stage lights fade up as Steve Jobs, 56, steps onto the stage to thunderous applause, excited whistling, standing ovation. Black mock turtleneck, worn jeans, sneakers. Jobs looks frail, incredibly gaunt. Like his legs can hardly carry him.

On the video screen behind him is a giant slide of the San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge at dawn.

Attendees are still clapping, many have raised their iPhones and iPads and madly snapping shots of Jobs on stage. Jobs looks a little overwhelmed, smiles.

JOBS
Welcome.

Jobs points out someone in the audience, beams. More clapping. Jobs clasps his hands together.

JOBS
Thank you, thank you very much.

Attendees begin to take their seats.

JOBS
It’s always —

An Attendee calls our from the audience.

ATTENDEE (O.C.)
We love you —

Some Attendees laugh and cheer. Jobs looks humbled.

JOBS
Thank you. It always helps. And I appreciate it very much.

Jobs will spend the next thirty-three minutes launching an operating system update, teasing a mobile OS update, and unveiling a new cloud-based service for backing up and syncing documents, photos, and music.

Jobs will thank everyone as he leaves the stage in a wave of applause and admiration.

This will be Jobs’ last public keynote address.

“Boscutti’s Steve Jobs” Scene 134

An ongoing daily series of scenes for a Steve Jobs biopic.

It’s a narrative experiment. It’s not going to follow a neat dramatic arc. It’s going to be a little episodic and random. Much like the subject matter.

To get the next scene in your inbox as soon as its written, click the + Follow button below or simply subscribe for free. If you change your mind later, unsubscribe with one click.

Share this scene with your friends.

 
 


 

“BOSCUTTI’S STEVE JOBS” SCENE 134

 

2010 – JOBS FAMILY HOME – PALO ALTO – EVENING

A car drives past the 1930s British country style home. It’s modest, low-roofed. Blends easily into the quiet neighborhood.

Sounds of dishes clattering. The kitchen window is clearly visible from the street. Through the kitchen window, Jobs, 55, is at the sink washing dishes. Wearing a black mock turtle neck. Complete focused on the task at hand.

There’s no tall wall blocking the kitchen window. No high fence. There’s a small orchard in the front yard. A tulip garden by the driveway.