The Sorrows - March 18

Maybe politicians would pay more attention if environmental protestors set themselves ablaze everywhere.

Not just outside the US Supreme Court or the UK Supreme Court but outside parliaments and ministry buildings and council offices. Corporate headquarters and foyers. Shops and shopping centres.

Most of us now breathe air made unhealthy by fossil fuels, and many die early deaths as a result. An early death by fossil fuel aided and abetted (and subsidised) by governments mirrors what we’re doing to our environment, to ourselves.

We’re killing ourselves slowly. Why drag it out?

We know rising atmospheric CO2 is damaging our natural world. We know the all too familiar list of calamities. Worsening heatwaves, less rain in the south, more rain in the north, more severe bushfires, cyclones, storms and ocean surges.

We play politics while the world burns. In the UK, politicians pretend to play hardball on migration while television presenters pretend to care. One BBC football presenter rightfully compares the current British government rhetoric on migration to Nazi Germany. It’s the same playbook. It’s the same language. It’s the same words - invasion, duty, power, honour, unity, struggle, triumph. (When a holocaust survivor calls out Suella Braverman’s hateful language, you really do need to dial it down.)

For BBC management to try and silence someone like Gary Lineker on “Match of the Day” for his comments on Twitter is preposterous. Did you see how many colleagues left their shows in support? BBC football coverage on television and radio was reduced to short slots of pre-programmed nonsense.

BBC boss Tim Davie worked himself into a lather with one ludicrous statement after the other as Gary blithely walked past a phalanx of reporters, taking higher and higher ground with each step. When did media bosses become such inept idiots?

And in other news, why is coffee about to become so much more expensive? Supply line issues and low yields thanks to rising temperatures from global heating.

Growing conditions due to extreme high temperatures have worsened in every region since 1980. With the most hazardous years occurring in the past decade.

Technically it’s known as ongoing systemic shocks. Which is a polite way of saying synchronised crop failures.

That may explain why coffee is so insipid in the UK. So weak and watery and increasingly expensive. Poorly grown robusta beans, apparently.

Here in Australia, everyone takes their coffee very seriously. I’m pretty sure children are taught about roasting and flavour profiles at primary school. Even McDonald’s serves a decent espresso.

But if the prices keep going up, I may need to take up tea like you.

The horror!

 


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